OBOC 2018-19


Shared Experiences Draw People Together.
Share a Book.
Share an Experience.

Shared experiences draw people together. That is why we are continuing the One Book, One Community (OBOC) program for its 10th year. Everyone in the school is invited to join together in reading and discussing Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond.

Selecting this Year’s Book: From the Dean

"Evicted by Matthew Desmond describes the plight of poor families who, for want of a few dollars, are forced to move from their homes, apartments, or trailers. An ethnographer, Desmond shares the intimate vicissitudes of his subject / friends as they struggle to make ends meet while negotiating a bewildering system of slumlords, public agencies, law enforcement, and courts, a system that seems almost designed to reinforce a downward spiral of poverty. The consequences of eviction are especially felt by mothers with young children, whose development is jeopardized by substandard housing, low quality neighborhoods, and poor nutrition. 

"Social factors are well known to be paramount determinants of health and well-being, and Evicted heartbreakingly illuminates how poverty and lack of housing affect families and communities. America’s health compares poorly to other economically developed counties. Everyone interested in improving public health should read Evicted to better understand poverty, housing, and health.”

The book has been a New York Times best seller, won a Pulitzer Prize, and was on Bill Gates’s summer reading list in 2017

OBOC 2019 Main Event: "Close to Home: Street Medicine" with founder James Withers on 3/28

 One Book One Community, the Global Health Student Association, and the Center for Global Health present the powerful 30-minute documentary Close to Home: Street Medicine which shares voices of service providers and oft-forgotten homeless patients in our region. Catch the film and hear directly from:

  • Jim Withers, founder and medical director of Pittsburgh Mercy’s Operation Safety Net® and the Street Medicine Institute.
  • Matt Lewis, producer and videographer of Close to Home, co-produced by PBS 39 and the Lehigh Valley Health Network.

Check out the @PittPubicHealth on Instagram to enter & win a free copy of Evicted.

 

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Read-Along Program

Alumni, families, and friends are invited to sign up below and read along with the school’s students and faculty by participating in the second read-along program. Read Evicted and participate in live and virtual events and discussions. Read more...

WHERE TO GET THE BOOK

Get 10 percent off at the University Store on Fifth (with Pitt ID).

Also available at Pitt's Hillman LibraryFalk Library (HSLS), and the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh

Questions?

With questions about OBOC, or to suggest an event, contact Kimmy Rehak, educational programs specialist.

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