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NIH – Shared Instrumentation Grant Program (S10) PAR-16-054 Pitt Deadline: March 28, 2016 NIH Deadline: May 16, 2016 The Shared Instrument Grant (SIG) Program (S10) PAR-16-054 encourages applications from groups of NIH-supported investigators to purchase or upgrade a single item of expensive, specialized, commercially available instruments or integrated systems that cost at least $50,000. The maximum award is $600,000. Types of instruments supported include, but are not limited to: X-ray diffraction systems, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometers, DNA and protein sequencers, biosensors, electron and confocal microscopes, cell-sorters, and biomedical imagers. Applications for "stand alone" computer systems (supercomputers, computer clusters and data storage systems) will only be considered if the instrument is solely dedicated to the research needs of a broad community of NIH-supported investigators. A single application requesting more than one type of instrument (for example, a mass spectrometer and a confocal microscope) is not appropriate for this FOA. Submission: There is no limit on the number of applications an institution may submit, provided the applications request different types of equipment. However, if two or more applications are submitted for similar equipment, Dr. Mark Redfern, Vice Provost for Research, must provide documentation stating that this is not an unintended duplication, but part of a campus-wide institutional plan. Because of this requirement, it is essential that the University of Pittsburgh coordinate its submissions. To allow enough time for this internal review, please complete the internal application form accessible at Competition Space no later than March 28, 2016. Final applications are due to NIH by May 16, 2016. For further information, please refer to the NIH announcement PAR- http://grants.nih.gov/grants/guide/pa-files/PAR-16-054.html 

2/12/2016
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