Resources for Alumni

Epidemiology alumni work in health care, government agencies, community-based organizations, research institutions, and industry, and are making a significant impact on emerging clinical care and public health policy.

We encourage you, our alumni, to get involved and extend your professional and social networks, and we welcome your participation in the variety of alumni activities planned by the department, school, and University.

If you’re one of our alumni, we want to connect with you.

Get Involved

Pitt Public Health, the schools of the health sciences, and the University of Pittsburgh Alumni Association plan events for alumni throughout the year. Check these out for more information:

Stay Connected

Volunteer to be a networking resource for public health students. Participate in recruitment fairs across the country. Attend school-sponsored lectures. Follow Pitt Public Health on social media. There are so many opportunities to stay connected as a Pitt Public Health and University of Pittsburgh alumnus. Click to find out how to get involved with mentoring, the magazine, class reunions and more. Learn about how you can donate to Pitt Public Health.

Find a Job

As an alumnus, you have access to Pitt Public Health and University job search tools and career resources, including PittBRIDGES, the school’s job and internship matching service. For more information, visit career services.

Share alumni news

Share your accomplishments, stories, or news—and stories of classmates or colleagues—at publichealth.pitt.edu/sharenews or by e-mailing phalum@pitt.edu. We’d love to hear from you!

Share news

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and Keep in Touch

Update your contact information to ensure that you receive invitations, e-newsletters, and the Pitt Public Health alumni magazine.

Epi Alumni Stories

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Identical twin kidney transplants warrant gene sequencing, Jorgensen says 

Identical twin kidney transplants warrant gene sequencing, Jorgensen says

MEDICAL EXPRESS - Researchers including Dana Jorgensen (EPI '14) found that kidney transplants between identical twins have high success rates, but also high rates of immunosuppressant use. About half of patients were on immunosuppresant drugs a year after transplant, but survival rates were about ... (11/05/2019)
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Barkin Index measures how mother's are doing post-partum 

Barkin Index measures how mother's are doing post-partum

MERCER NEWS - Jennifer Barkin (EPI ’09, BIOST ’02), has created a new tool that could help disrupt the maternal health crisis. During her time at Pitt Public Health, Barkin created the Barkin Index to measure how a new mother is functioning in her day-to-day post-baby life. Now her index is being u... (10/07/2019)
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Taylor baked his way to first place and a book deal 

Taylor baked his way to first place and a book deal

PITT WIRE -  Chris Taylor (SHRS ’04, EPI ’10) originally started baking as a way to relax while studying at Pitt Public Health. After entering, and winning, their first competition on a whim, Taylor and husband Paul Arguin, who are both epidemiologists at the CDC, continued baking and competing as ... (09/11/2019)
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Memory slips may be worrisome, but Ganguli study shows it's often not Alzheimer's 

Memory slips may be worrisome, but Ganguli study shows it's often not Alzheimer's

NJ.COM - New research suggests taht even for adults who develop noticeable cognitive impairments in later life, that doesn't mean they have Alzheimer's or will progress to Alzheimer's anytime soon. Mary Ganguli (EPI '87) says the findings suggest no one should jump to hasty conclusions about people... (05/29/2019)
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Kip: 2019 Distinguished Alumni Award for Research 

Kip: 2019 Distinguished Alumni Award for Research

Kevin Kip (EPI ’98) is a Distinguished Health Professor at the University of South Florida College of Public Health as well as an epidemiologist with 18 years of research experience on federally funded and industry-sponsored studies. He is a methodologist with expertise in a wide range of health di... (04/22/2019)
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