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Environmental and Occupational Health
environmental and occupational health

Environmental and Occupational Health

Who's Making Sure
Our Environment
Isn't Making Us Sick?
Learn more
our research centers

Our Research Centers

Get involved in our research centers, where you can join a research project or help translate findings into practice and policy.
See our centers
our faculty

Our Faculty

Meet the faculty who will teach and mentor you, and learn about the innovative research projects they're directing.
Meet our faculty
our alumni

Our Alumni

Read about what our graduates are doing in the environmental and occupational health field.
Meet our alumni

Environmental and Occupational Health

The Environmental and Occupational Health (EOH) Department has a sound reputation as a leader in training students to...
  • Identify agents that affect health
  • Study the long-term effects of environmental and occupational health risks
  • Determine the molecular mechanisms of toxic agents that contribute to the development of certain illnesses and diseases.

Environmental health specialists help find ways to promote healthier environments and minimize risks that increase the incidence of respiratory, cardiovascular, and musculoskeletal diseases, asthma, lower respiratory infections, road traffic injuries, poisonings, and drownings.
Occupational health specialists study all aspects of health and safety in the workplace. From exposure to toxins on the job, to workplace violence and lifting injuries, occupational hazards create an enormous health burden, unnecessary pain and suffering, and economic loss in the workplace.

Find a research program for your interests

Many EOH faculty members collaborate with basic sciences and clinical investigators throughout other departments at Pitt Public Health, and the University of Pittsburgh schools of medicine and engineering. Students and faculty perform studies on the principles and practice of environmental health ranging from basic research at the cellular and molecular level to applied translational studies of human disease, population exposure, and public health studies.

In addition, faculty and students work with local governmental organizations, such as the Allegheny County Health Department, the Pittsburgh Office of the U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and the Allegheny County Sanitary Authority to study and improve the environmental health of southwestern Pennsylvania.

Pursue a career in environmental and occupational health

Doctoral degree graduates are prepared to work in laboratory-based academic settings as faculty or postdoctoral fellows and become prominent members of government agencies and independent industries. Recent graduates have obtained fellowships at top-tier academic institutions, positions with
the National Institutes of Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, and in firms conducting chemical and environmental risk assessment.

Master's degree graduates play prominent roles as environmental/occupational health practitioners in various settings, including industry, hospitals, government agencies, and private practice.

Degrees

The EOH Department offers two degrees in the environmental health sciences, providing a broad theoretical and practical education for positions in academia, industry, or government. The multiple tracks provide flexibility in acquiring advance training in toxicology, environmental biophysics, molecular and cellular pathobiology, risk assessment, and exposure science. Our professional degree program allows students to earn concentrations in environmental health or risk assessment and apply these concepts to public health practice. Our doctorate-level professional degree program in environmental health sciences provides education for those who aspire to high-level administration or decision-making leadership positions.

 

Goldstein on Herbert Needleman, who made groundbreaking discoveries on lead poisoning in children

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE - “Her...
Goldstein on Herbert Needleman, who made groundbreaking discoveries on lead poisoning in children

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE - “Herb’s science — to use a term already used by others — was an inconvenient truth,” said BERNARD GOLDSTEIN, former dean of Pitt Public Health and EOH professor emeritus. “It was ground-breaking work of the highest importance.... He was a hero to all of us in the public hea... (07/20/2017)

Goldstein comments on Paradise cost: coal, natural gas, and the true price of power

WV PUBLIC RADIO - Professor an...
Goldstein comments on Paradise cost: coal, natural gas, and the true price of power

WV PUBLIC RADIO - Professor and dean emeritus BERNARD GOLDSTEIN said he thinks the gas industry, which is highly fragmented, has missed opportunities to clearly address concerns about its own environmental effects. Those include air and water pollution near drilling sites, disposal concerns related ... (07/16/2017)

Goldstein on the clarion call for scientists and the EPA

E&E NEWS - The debate has gone...
Goldstein on the clarion call for scientists and the EPA

E&E NEWS - The debate has gone on for some time over whether scientists should simply lay out their information and let politicians decide how to use it or advocate for a specific policies. Emeritus EOH professor and emeritus dean BERNARD GOLDSTEIN, who also served as assistant administrator for res... (06/22/2017)

Bernstein addresses Congressional roundatble on climate change (video)

U.S. CONGRESS - On June 20, 20...
Bernstein addresses Congressional roundatble on climate change (video)

U.S. CONGRESS - On June 20, 2017, emeritus dean and professor BERNARD GOLDSTEIN called on lawmakers to support a research agenda to mitigate global climate change during special D.C. hearing. As an expert environmental toxicologist, he emphasized the need to address conservatives’ reasons for not tr... (06/21/2017)

Fabisiak and Brink: Air pollution increases regional health risks

PITTSBURGH TODAY - “PM2.5 is p...
Fabisiak and Brink: Air pollution increases regional health risks

PITTSBURGH TODAY - “PM2.5 is probably the chief concern for the region, mainly because of its contribution from a source as big as the Clairton plant has an effect over a fairly large area,” said EOH associate prof JAMES FABISIAK.... “Everything that’s a risk factor for bad health is showing up high... (06/01/2017)
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