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One Book, One Community Read-Along

Shared Experiences Draw People Together.
Share a Book. Share an Experience.

Pitt Public Health's One Book, One Community (OBOC) program is a school-wide "communal read" of a single book focused on a topic affecting the field of public health. Alumni, families, and friends are invited to sign up below and read along with the school's students and faculty. You'll also be invited to participate in a variety of programming during the year, including live and virtual discussions and events. 
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Minimize Events

One Book, One Community Main Event:
Many Disciplines, One Discussion

Wednesday, November 29, 6 p.m.
Public Health Auditorium (G23)

Join a discussion from multiple public health perspectives, featuring EOH’s Patricia Opresko, EPI’s Jian-Min Yuan, BCHS’ Patricia Documet, HPM’s Lindsay Sabik, and moderated by Dean Donald Burke.
Reception to follow in the Commons.

CPH-CE credit available both in-person and to viewers of live-streamed event.
Support for this event made possible through the University's Year of Healthy U initiative. 

Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies, Episode 2 | "The Blind Men and the Elephant" 

Tuesday, December 5, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
A312 Crabtree Hall

Film screening and discussion featuring Jessie Burke, associate dean for education and associate professor, behavioral and community health sciences, and Ruth Modzelewski, mission coordinator at Susan G. Komen Pittsburgh and Pitt Public Health alum.

Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies, Episode 3 | “Finding the Achilles Heel”

Wednesday, January 24, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.
A521 Crabtree Hall

Film screening and discussion featuring Jessie Burke, associate dean for education and associate professor, behavioral and community health sciences, and Ruth Modzelewski, mission coordinator at Susan G. Komen Pittsburgh and Pitt Public Health alum.

Movie Screening and Discussion | How I Live with Cancer

Thursday, March 22, time TBD
Public Health Auditorium (G23)

Sponsored by Center for Global Health, Global Health Student Association, and the Office of Student Affairs.

Maximize Completed OBOC Events (2017-18)

Give an Experience

For a gift of $25, you can underwrite a book and an experience for a current student. Give now...

CPH-CE Credits

CPH-CE credits can be earned by participating in discussions.
(1 CPH-CE credit per hour)

Questions?

Contact Sarah McMullen and the school's alumni relations team for details or questions about the read-along program.

Minimize OBOC News

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Colon cancer risk depends on polyp type found during colonoscopy 

Colon cancer risk depends on polyp type found during colonoscopy

HEALIO - The risk for colorectal cancer is about 2.5 times higher in patients who have advanced adenomatous polyps detected during colonoscopy vs. those with no adenomas, but the risk does not appear to be increased among patients with non-advanced adenomas. These findings suggest that repeat colon... (05/17/2018)
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Submit suggestions for the 10th year of OBOC 

Submit suggestions for the 10th year of OBOC

It's that time again. Submit your suggestions for next year's One Book, One Community title. We will be celebrating 10 years of this initiative that has encouraged interdisciplinary collaboration among faculty, staff, students, alumni, and friends through reading a shared book relative to public he... (04/25/2018)

One Book, One Community: an interdisciplinary cancer collaboration 

One Book, One Community: an interdisciplinary cancer collaboration

ASPPH FRIDAY LETTER - Faculty, students, and staff are paying particularly close attention to cancer and working to enhance interdisciplinary collaborations to fight the disease. Each of Pitt Public Health's seven departments employs its own critical lens for exploring how to prevent disease and pr... (02/12/2018)
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Lee discovers breast cancer mutation 

Lee discovers breast cancer mutation

“We think we now have tools to measure changes to tumors that have become resistant to therapy,” says HUGEN’s ADRIAN LEE, who identified a new genetic change in the estrogen receptor that hinders treatment of breast cancer in some patients, uncovering new clues for potential improved treatments for... (02/09/2018)
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Kuller endorses statement warning breast cancer patients may be at increased risk for heart disease 

Kuller endorses statement warning breast cancer patients may be at increased risk for heart disease

CNN - The American Heart Association released a scientific statement, published in Circulation, warning that breast cancer patients may be at an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and could benefit from discussing those risks with their doctors. The statement is "long overdue," said EPI's ... (02/06/2018)
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Lee looks to genes to develop more targeted breast cancer therapies 

Lee looks to genes to develop more targeted breast cancer therapies

HEALTH NEWS DIGEST - The current movement in breast cancer research is matching DNA with targeted therapies and HUGEN's ADRIAN LEE is at the forefront. "We know now that no two cancers are alike...the concept is, with our ability to more comprehensively understand the genetic basis of the disease, ... (01/25/2018)
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Moore on the infection connection for some skin cancers 

Moore on the infection connection for some skin cancers

CURE - “New technology is allowing us to find cancers that may have a (previously unknown) infectious origin,” says PATRICK MOORE, professor of infectious diseases, microbiology, molecular genetics, and biochemistry. He is credited with co-discovering viral links to two types of skin cancer: Kaposi ... (12/16/2017)
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Kagan helps find mechanism of dendritic cell needed for antitumor immune response 

Kagan helps find mechanism of dendritic cell needed for antitumor immune response

DRUG TARGET REVIEW - A team including EOH researcher VALERIAN KAGAN has revealed the mechanism causing defective function of tumour-associated dendritic cells, explaining why they’re ineffective in inducing antitumor immune responses and effective cancer treatment. The findings could lead to new str... (12/15/2017)

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