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Pitt Public Health is now a member of HSHPS

The Graduate School pf Public Health is now a member of the Hispanic Serving Professions Schools (HSHPS). http://www.hshps.org/programs/gftp 

Toyota Foundation Grant for Public Health Research on Trialect

Toyota Foundation Grant for Public Health Research on Trialect 

Places with More Marijuana Dispensaries Have More Marijuana-Related Hospitalizations

People who live in areas of California with a higher density of marijuana dispensaries experience a greater number of hospitalizations involving marijuana abuse and dependence, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health analysis discovered. 

Congratulations Natalie Fisher!

HPM is pleased to announce that 2015 MHA Alumna Natalie Fisher will be the Manager of Operations at Oneview Healthcare in Cranberry http://www.oneviewhealthcare.com.  

Trevor Orchard appointed Distinguished Professor at the University of Pittsburgh

I am delighted to announce that Trevor Orchard, MD, M.Med.Sci. has been appointed to the rank of Distinguished Professor at the University of Pittsburgh. 

Menopause Associated with More Fat Around Heart, Raising Risk for Heart Disease

Late- and post-menopausal women have significantly greater volumes of fat around their hearts – a risk factor for heart disease – than their pre-menopausal counterparts, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health study has shown for the first time. 

This Year's One Book, One Community Program

Pick up Dreamland  by Sam Quinones to read along!  Listen to interviews and find out more at publichealth.pitt.edu/OBOC   

Cholesterol Metabolism in Immune Cells Linked to HIV Progression, May Lead to New Therapy

Enhanced cholesterol metabolism in certain immune cells may help some people infected with HIV naturally control disease progression, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. 

Early HIV Treatment Improves Survival in Some Patients with Newly Diagnosed TB

Starting anti-HIV treatment within two weeks of the diagnosis of tuberculosis, or TB, improved survival among patients with both infections who had very low immune-cell counts, according to an analysis by researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Health. Those with strong immune systems, however, might benefit from waiting until after the end of the six-month TB treatment before initiating anti-HIV therapy, they found.   

BCHS Faculty Published in the Journal BMC Cancer

Dr. Tiffany Gary-Webb and colleagues published the first systematic review and meta-analysis in the Journal BMC Cancer. 

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