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A Simple Test to Save Your Bones

It's easy to take your bones for granted — especially since they're built to withstand tiny fractures, often without causing symptoms. But such "silent" fractures should not go unnoticed — or untreated — according to new research published this week in the Journal of the American Medical Association. 

Holiday Party

 

Pitt epidemiologist says privacy rule hinders research

 

Not All the News on Bariatric Surgery Is Good

 

Pitt to study health effects of genetics, environment

 

Pitt Professor Named President-Elect of the American College of Epidemiology

 

Diabetes cure is a mystery, but prevention isn't

 

Heavier diabetics have less heart disease

 

Are we turning a deaf ear on dangers of noise pollution?

 

Department of Epidemiology Student Newsletter

 

Ambassadors volunteer to promote healthy aging

 

WHI study calms worry over hormone use for some

 

Health study points finger at Pittsburgh's soot hazard

A recent national study showing airborne soot remains a significant health hazard for women was based in part on data collected in Pittsburgh, where such pollution remains dangerously high 

A research triumph helps women

Breast cancer incidence rates are taking a sharp downturn. A likely explanation is the cessation of postmenopausal hormone therapy in response to the report that hormone therapy increased breast cancer risk in the Women's Health Initiative trial. This story represents a triumph of epidemiology and clinical trial research 

Pitt Forms New Center To Accelerate Global Research And Outreach Efforts On Healthy Aging

Striving to apply recent scientific advances in understanding the determinants of healthy aging, the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health (GSPH) has announced the formation of a new Center for Aging and Population Health (CAPH), which will be led by Anne B. Newman , M.D., M.P.H., professor of epidemiology and medicine, GSPH 

Regular Multivitamin Use Around The Time Of Conception Significantly Reduces Preeclampsia Risk

 

Study discounts cancer, statin link

Older women who take popular cholesterol-lowering drugs called statins are not more susceptible to breast cancer as some previous data suggest, and one type of these drugs might even reduce risk of the disease 

Walk This Way: Inability To Complete Quarter-Mile Walk Is Significant Predictor Of Death And Poor Health In Elderly

Walking fitness makes a significant difference in predicting the likelihood of future disability in the elderly, according to a study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association . Researchers at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health (GSPH)  

No drop in heart disease in diabetics

A new study of local patients with Type I diabetes has found that the rates of heart disease and some other diabetes-related complications did not decline over time 

Depression That Doesn’t Respond To One Drug May Respond To Another, According To Two Studies In NEJM

One in four people with treatment resistant depression will do better by switching to a different antidepressant and one in three will benefit from adding an additional drug to their current antidepressant therapy 

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EOH alumna Lauren Chubb is looking beyond what the eye can see to keep miners safe. 

EOH alumna Lauren Chubb is looking beyond what the eye can see to keep miners safe.

PITT MAGAZINE - Lauren Chubb, DrPH, MPH (EOH ’16, ’13) occasionally dons a hard hat to see the results of her work in the lab. Her team at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health's Mining Program has developed software to analyze respirable dust samples in just a few minutes, rath... (08/05/2019)
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Chaves-Gnecco Named 2019 Pediatrician of the Year 

Chaves-Gnecco Named 2019 Pediatrician of the Year

PITTWIRE - Diego Chaves-Gnecco (MMPH '00) has been named 2019 Pediatrician of the Year by the American Academy of Pediatrics, Pennsylvania Chapter. The award recognizes a chapter member who exemplifies excellence in the profession. (05/29/2019)
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National, county research partnerships use AI to better predict opioid overdose risk 

National, county research partnerships use AI to better predict opioid overdose risk

PITTWIRE - HPM's Walid Gellad is using machine-learning algorithms to predict who is at risk of opioid misuse and overdose, teaming up with Allegheny County officials and national health care databanks in two separate studies.  (05/29/2019)


Featuring the latest research, opportunities, and groundbreaking developments from CEPH-accredited schools and programs of public health. Review theFriday Letter submission guidelines then share your story ideas via publichealth.pitt.edu/share-news or contact phcomm@pitt.edu. 

Pitt Public Health finds weight-loss patients at higher risk of death from substance use disorders 

Pitt Public Health finds weight-loss patients at higher risk of death from substance use disorders

ASPPH FRIDAY LETTER - The death rate from drug- and alcohol-related causes in people who've had Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery is nearly triple that of the general public, according to research led by EPI's Wendy King. The study also found that fewer than half of those who died had triggered a sa... (06/27/2019)

Pitt Public Health sheds light on 'black box' of inpatient opioid use 

Pitt Public Health sheds light on 'black box' of inpatient opioid use

ASPPH FRIDAY LETTER - People who receive opioids for the first time while hospitalized have double the risk of continuing to receive opioids for months after discharge compared with their hospitalized peers who are not given opioids, according to research led by HPM's Julie Donohue.  (06/27/2019)
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Pitt Public Health epidemiologist to lead creation of global infectious disease data system 

Pitt Public Health epidemiologist to lead creation of global infectious disease data system

ASPPH FRIDAY LETTER - Backed by a five-year, $6.7 million National Institutes of Health grant, PHDL's Wilbert Van Panhuis will lead a culture shift in data-sharing rippling through scientific fields and harness it to improve global knowledge of infectious diseases.  (06/06/2019)