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Epidemiology Faculty News

Van Panhuis on the myth of spacing out kids’s vaccines

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CONSUMER REPORTS - It’s unwise to delay or spread out vaccines, says EPI’s WILBERT VAN PANHUIS. The CDC bases the schedule on disease risks, vaccine effectiveness at specific ages, and the way vaccines may interact with each other. “To start mixing this up is really complicated and actually can be dangerous.” The MMR vaccine, for instance, is timed so that children receive it just as they’ve lost residual immunity from their mothers. And measles,... 

University of Pittsburgh architects a versatile HPC system to facilitate breakthrough research

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SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING - With the assistance of Pitt’s high-performance computing (HPC) system, EPI’s ASHLEY NAIMI conducts a randomized trial of 1,200 volunteers to determine if a small, daily dose of aspirin may help women to more easily achieve pregnancy and to carry a baby to term. “Our data-intensive research relies on machine learning algorithms to interpret the data we collect.... With the new processors in place, we can obtain meaningful in... 

Salcido's Pulse Point app alerts citizens to cardiac arrent patients in need (video)

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CBS PITTSBURGH - Alumnus DAVID SALCIDO (EPI ’08), resuscitation specialist and assistant professor in Pitt’s Department of Emergency Medicine, is hoping his app can help save lives in Pittsburgh and Allegheny County. The free app, called Pulse Point, is connected to the Allegheny County 911 system, so that those who know CPR to get to those in need before paramedics arrive. Listen to the interview and learn more about the app. 

Why the CDC needs number crunchers on the front lines of the opioid epidemic

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90.5 WESA - Who’s needed to fight the battle? At the October 2, 2017, conference sponsored by the PUBLIC HEALTH DYNAMICS LABORATORY and CTSI, CDC’s Sarah Bacon said an essential group of people must crunch the numbers to better understand the hows and the whys of the crisis: mathematicians, epidemiologists, data scientists, and statisticians. 

Thurston research says being sexually harassed may have long-term physical consequences

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FORBES - The past several weeks have seen a regular flow of sexual harassment allegations against high profile individuals and a flood of heartfelt stories on the Internet in response to the #MeToo social media hashtag. But as epidemiologist REBECCA THURSTON has found, traumatic experiences such as sexual harassment may affect your blood vessels, your blood flow, and potentially your heart. “We found that a history of more traumatic experiences w... 

Fabio's research on gun ownership cited in New York Times

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NEW YORK TIMES - Research by Epi's TONY FABIO, was cited by op-ed columnist Bret Stephen's piece "Repeal the Second Amendment." Fabio's study, published in 2016 in the journal Social Medicine, analyzed the guns recovered by Pittsburgh Police and found that the vast majority were not carried by their legal owners.  

Thurston finds just three awful events is all it takes for a woman to end up with heart disease

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DAILY MAIL, UK - This study, led by EPI’s REBECCA THURSTON, is one of the first of its kind to assess the impact of trauma on heart disease risk. She said, “These findings underscore the importance of psychosocial factors, such as trauma exposure, in the development of heart disease risk in midlife women.” Thurston is a professor of epidemiology, psychiatry, and psychology, and director of the Women’s Biobehavioral Health Laboratory at Pitt. 

Kuller comments on why hypertension-linked dementia may impact more women than men

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It is known that high blood pressure in one’s 50s puts a person at risk for dementia in later life. It's now know that hypertension in the 30s and 40s has a similar effect, but only in women. LEWIS KULLER, epidemiology professor emeritus, talks about why this unexpected research finding might be true.  

Salcido returns as epidemiology seminar speaker

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Alumnus DAVID SALCIDO (EPI ’08) was guest lecturer for the September 21, 2017, epidemiology seminar with a talk titled “Cardiac Arrest, Resuscitation and the Opioid Epidemic.” He began his resuscitation research work in 2006. Since then he has developed interests in cardiac arrest physiology (acute phase), resuscitation device and robotics development, signal analysis, and emergency medicine epidemiology. 

Glynn finds small increases in physical activity reduce immobility, disability risks in older adults

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TUFTS NOW - Adding 48 minutes of moderate exercise per week is associated with improvements in overall physical functioning and decreases in risks of immobility in older adults who are sedentary, finds a new study assisted by author NANCY GLYNN, epidemiology researcher with the Center for Aging and Population Health. 

Rockette-Wagner finds that sitting for long periods each day linked to increased mortality

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TRIB LIVE - Even people who exercise the recommended two-and-a-half hours per week likely face an increased risk of death if they sit a lot every day, according to a new study on sitting’s health risks. The science of sedentary behavior is more limited than the science of physical activity, said epidemiology’s BONNIE ROCKETTE-WAGNER. She tells people to find creative ways to get up and move around – whether it’s pausing a TV show to get a little ... 

Harrison on school requirements for child vaccines

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NBC PHILADELPHIA - State officials want both public and private school students to be up-to-date with all their vaccinations within five days of the beginning of the school year, a drastic reduction from the eight months that pupils used to have to get their shots. Epidemiology’s LEE HARRISON says outbreaks of infectious diseases have demonstrated the need for high immunization rates. 

Van Panhuis offers wisdom on some common myths about vaccines for kids

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CONSUMER REPORTS - Myth 2: It’s Safer to Space Out Kids’ Vaccines. Truth: No. Epidemiologist WILBERT VAN PANHUIS says that’s unwise. The CDC bases the schedule on disease risks and vaccine effectiveness at specific ages, and the way vaccines may interact with each other. To start mixing this up is complicated and can be dangerous. 

Garland and Fabio want more data to understand neighborhood variations in the deadliness of Pittsburgh shootings

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PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE - Dozens of potential factors cause the deadliness rate of shootings to vary widely across the city geographically and from year-to-year. BCHS’ RICHARD GARLAND and EPI’s ANTHONY FABIO, who study troubled youth and violence, wish more police data was available to find patterns in the factors influencing fatality rates. 

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