Directory Calendar News Careers Alumni Giving

News

NSF: Pitt among top 25 universities for R&D at No. 18

image
PITTSBURGH BUSINESS TIMES  - The University of Pittsburgh is again among the nation's top 25 higher education institutions in terms of total research and development expenditures, coming in at No. 18 in 2015, according to the National Science Foundation . Pitt reported $866.6 million in total R&D expenditures in 2015, up from the $856.8 million in 2014. Pitt receives the majority of its research funding from the federal government. In fact, ... 

Dabigatran Superior to Warfarin When Anticoagulation is Resumed After Bleeding

image
PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW - In the first analysis of how to treat patients on anticoagulants who suffer a major bleeding event, a clinical practice that routinely gives doctors pause, while also evaluating a new drug, University of Pittsburgh researchers lead by Pitt Public Health alumna INMACULADA HERNANDEZ (HPM '16)aim to provide much-needed guidance to clinicians trying to balance the risks of stroke versus bleeding when determining the best ... 

#ItsGoodToGive: Kate Fletcher

image
PITTSBURGH POST GAZETTE profiles Pitt Public Health alumna Kate Fletcher (HSA ‘80) as part of the #ItsGoodToGive series. After serving as a nun, primary school teacher, nursing home manager, and then adjunct professor, Fletcher decided at age 64 to follow destiny’s call to Kenya. In response to the plight of millions of orphans in sub-Sahara Africa, she has dedicated the last 14 years to establishing Hekima Place, a children’s home in Kenya f... 

Myths and truths about gun violence in Pennsylvania

image
PUBLICSOURCE via NEW PITTSBURGH COURIER - … A recent study by ANTHONY FABIO, associate professor of epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh, found that nearly 80 percent of guns obtained by Pittsburgh police in 2008 were not held by their original owner. 

Microcephaly Found in Babies of Zika-Infected Mothers Months After Birth

image
NEW YORK TIMES - Dr. Ernesto T. A. Marques Jr., an infectious disease specialist at the University of Pittsburgh and the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation in Recife, who was not involved in either study, said it could be that because of the initial fetal brain damage, “the necessary pathways and hormones that organize growth of the neonatal brain are not there anymore and the brain doesn’t grow.” 

To disrupt cancer growth, 2 Pittsburgh labs try cutting its fuel

image
PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE REVIEW - Patricia Opresko , associate professor of environmental and occupational health  at Pitt Public Health, studies stopping telomere growth by bombarding parts of cells with free radicals, the harmful atoms that can be generated from smoking, stress and other environmental factors. The results of her work--published this month in the journal Nature Structural and Molecular Biology-- suggest that oxidative stress, if d... 

Alumnus Chaves-Gnecco Awarded 2016 FUERZA Award

image
Diego Chaves-Gnecco (MMPH '00) was recently awarded the 2016 FUERZA Award by Cafe Con Leche for his work with Salud Para Niños and service to Pittsburgh's Latino community. “The FUERZA Awards celebrate local Latinx talent and the contributions they have made to the Pittsburgh region,” said founder, Tara Sherry-Torres. 

The OjO Latino Photo-project: What does it mean to be Latino in Pittsburgh?

What does it mean to be Latino in Pittsburgh? Through the OjO Latino  project, twelve Latino community members will explore answers through photography and collective discussion highlighting the daily struggles, fears, and desires of immigrants in Pittsburgh. 

Additives like fentanyl are making the opioid epidemic deadlier in Pittsburgh

image
PUBLIC SOURCE profiles how Pitt Public Health alumnus AARON ARNOLD (BCHS '12) is working to limit overdose deaths from fentanyl-laced opioids as executive director of  PREVENTION POINT PITTSBURGH . Read the full story. 

Donald S. Burke addresses "Forecasting the opioid epidemic" in Science

image
SCIENCE - Since 2000, almost half a million Americans have died from drug overdoses. This modern plague—largely driven by opioid addiction—degrades health, saps productivity, spawns crime, and devastates families, all at enormous societal cost. How did we get here, and what do we do now? Dean Donald S. Burke , MD, of Pitt Public Health advocates in the November 4, 2016 issue of Science that "a new, public health–oriented approach is neede... 

Burke provides tools for understanding the opioid "Path to Hell"

image
PITT MED - Amid the wreckage of the opioid crisis, DONALD S. BURKE, dean of the Graduate School of Public Health, has contributed to the discussion of the epidemic with a time-lapsed graphic of accidental poisoning deaths in the United States, with counties colored according to their death rates. By the mid-2000s, the map displayed explosive color all around the nation (with a red hot spot indicating poisonings in Western Pennsylvania).  

Pitt class presenting naloxone recommendations to national public health group

image
PITTSBURGH BUSINESS TIMES - A University of Pittsburgh public health law class that recently presented five recommendations for curbing opioid deaths in the region using naloxone to the Allegheny County Health Department will share those recommendations today at the American Public Health Association's annual meeting in Denver.The two-year-old class, Law in Public Health Practice, focused its semester-long research into tackling opioid abuse on ... 

Meet Amanda Everman (HUGEN '18), Dean's Scholar

image
“I don’t think I chose public health. Public health chose me....The more I learned about genetics, the more I knew it was what I wanted to focus on for my career,” she says. The Philadelphia native and Penn State grad says the short distance from her hometown and in-state tuition are nice bonuses, and she’s enjoying her new city. “I was surprised at how different Pittsburgh is from Philadelphia."  

Meet Simon Yohannes (MMPH '17), Dean's Scholar

image
Third-year medical student Simon Yohannes decided on Pitt Public Health's Multidisciplinary Master of Public Health  to better serve the communities he cares about most. “I chose public health because of my interest in psychiatry—particularly in immigrant and refugee populations.” 

Meet BCHS's Sarah Sanders, Dean's Scholar

image
Dean's Scholar Sarah Sanders (BCHS '18) chose to pursue a career in public health after she was exposed to the roadblocks women and families sometimes face when trying to access consistent, quality health care. “On a small scale I was able to address some of these barriers,” she says, “I envision a world, or at least a city, where culturally competent health care pervades on a community level, where folks are being cared for at every interval o... 

Meet Helen Ann Lawless, MPH student in BCHS

image
Like many high school students who excel in the quantitative sciences and express a desire to enter health care, Helen Ann Lawless (BCHS '18) was encouraged to become a doctor.  “Once I discovered the field of public health, I knew I could still be involved in the health field while exploring my interests in population health, I changed my major...and never looked back.”  Today, she marvels on her journey from a Pitt undergraduate to a Pitt Pub... 

Meet Joanna Shaw (IDM ’18), Dean’s Scholar

image
Unsure of whether to pursue an MD, a PhD, or both, incoming Dean's Scholar JOANNA SHAW chose Pitt Public Health's Department of Infections Diseases and Microbiology to further develop her research and lab skills while she solidifies her research and career plans... 

Meet Dean's Scholar Peter Lewellen (HPM '18)

image
Meet  Peter Lewellen , a pre-med graduate of Duke University and incoming Dean's Scholar in the Department of Health Policy and Management. A native of Manitowoc, WI, Lewellen is pursuing his Master of Health Administration (MHA) and also plans to complete the department's Health Systems Engineering Certificate with Pitt's Swanson School of Engineering... 

Healthy Lifestyle in Old Age Shortens End-of-Life Disability

image
MEDICAL XPRESS - Leading a healthy lifestyle not only extends one’s lifespan, but it also shortens the time that is spent disabled—a finding that had previously eluded public health scientists and demonstrates the value of investing in healthy lifestyle promotion, even among the elderly.  "This clearly demonstrates the great value of investing in the promotion of a healthy lifestyle and encouraging people to maintain healthy behaviors into old a... 

Alumna vaccinates morning radio hosts

image
KDKA RADIO - Lauren Bealafeld Brungo  (BCHS ’15), nurse supervisor for the Allegheny County Health Department, gave flu shots live-and-on-air to KDKA Morning Show hosts Larry and John. Check out the insider video. 

Page 22 of 25First   Previous   16  17  18  19  20  21  [22]  23  24  25  Next   Last   

Search for an Article

Share Your News

Find news by department

Use the "Search for an article" field above to filter news by keyword, or follow the links below to view by department:

The University's official news source showcases Pitt's most interesting and important stories. Find out more and subscribe for alerts at pittwire.pitt.edu.
image

Thurston finds link between traumatic events and future heart disease risk in women 

Thurston finds link between traumatic events and future heart disease risk in women

PITT WIRE - When we consider the determinants of women’s cardiovascular health, we need to think beyond biology alone,” said epidemiologist Rebecca Thurston. She recently led a study that demonstrates how traumatic experiences in life are linked to later vascular health issues that place women at ri... (12/12/2017)
image

Large Pitt-led study uncovers complex genetics behind earlobe attachment 

Large Pitt-led study uncovers complex genetics behind earlobe attachment

PITTWIRE - New research led by Pitt Public Health affiliates and published in the  American Journal of Human Genetics  reveals that an interplay of at least 49 genes contributes to earlobe attachment inheritance. “Sometimes the genetics of a fairly simple trait are actually quite complex,” said ... (12/06/2017)
image

Enigma: Marques worked to pinpoint culprit of mysterious illness in Brazil 

Enigma: Marques worked to pinpoint culprit of mysterious illness in Brazil

PITTWIRE - When a mysterious illness suddenly emerged in his Brazilian hometown, IDM researcher ERNESTO MARQUES mobilized with colleagues to decode its unknowns. The work may help infectious-disease researchers stop or stall new epidemics. His story begins on page 18. (10/24/2017)
© 2018 by University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health

Login  |  Sitemap