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Wed
3/29
Pitt Public Health Lecture
Grand Rounds Lauren Hughes - "Pennsylvania Department of Health's Rural Health Initiative" Pitt Public Health Lecture
Lauren Hughes - "Pennsylvania Department of Health's Rural Health Initiative"
Wed 3/29 11:30AM - 12:30PM
Public Health A215

The Pennsylvania Department of Health is exploring an innovative budgeting process to help save some of our rural hospitals in danger of closing. Losing these hospitals would remove access to health care and public health services for many, worsening the health of the state. 

Presented by Lauren Hughes, MD, MPH, MSc, FAAFP, a practicing family physician and deputy secretary for health innovation, PA Dept. of Health. 

Thu
3/30
EOH Journal Club
EOH Journal Club - Spring 2017 - Shuo Cao EOH Journal Club
EOH Journal Club - Spring 2017 - Shuo Cao
Thu 3/30 11:00AM - 12:00PM
Bridgeside Point - 339

EOH Journal Club Seminar - Spring 2017

Date: Thursday March 30, 2017

Time: 11am - 12pm

Presenter: Shuo Cao

Paper: Structural and transcriptomic response to antenatal corticosteroids in an Erk3-null mouse model of respiratory distress

Authors: Pew BK, Harris RA, Sbrana E, Guaman MC, Shope C, Chen R, Meloche S, Aagaard K.

Abstract:
BACKGROUND:
Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants is a leading cause of neonatal death. Pulmonary insufficiency-related infant mortality rates have improved with antenatal glucocorticoid treatment and neonatal surfactant replacement. However, the mechanism of glucocorticoid-promoted fetal lung maturation is not understood fully, despite decades of clinical use. We previously have shown that genetic deletion of Erk3 in mice results in growth restriction, cyanosis, and early neonatal lethality because of pulmonary immaturity and respiratory distress. Recently, we demonstrated that the addition of postnatal surfactant administration to antenatal dexamethasone treatment resulted in enhanced survival of neonatal Erk3-null mice.

OBJECTIVE:
To better understand the molecular underpinnings of corticosteroid-mediated lung maturation, we used high-throughput transcriptomic and high-resolution morphologic analysis of the murine fetal lung. We sought to examine the alterations in fetal lung structure and function that are associated with neonatal respiratory distress and antenatal glucocorticoid treatment.

STUDY DESIGN:
Dexamethasone (0.4 mg/kg) or saline solution was administered to pregnant dams on embryonic days 16.5 and 17.5. Fetal lungs were collected and analyzed by microCT and RNA-seq for differential gene expression and pathway interactions with genotype and treatment. Results from transcriptomic analysis guided further investigation of candidate genes with the use of immunostaining in murine and human fetal lung tissue.

RESULTS:
Erk3(-/-) mice exhibited atelectasis with decreased overall porosity and saccular space relative to wild type, which was ameliorated by glucocorticoid treatment. Of 596 differentially expressed genes (q < 0.05) that were detected by RNA-seq, pathway analysis revealed 36 genes (q < 0.05) interacting with dexamethasone, several with roles in lung development, which included corticotropin-releasing hormone and surfactant protein B. Corticotropin-releasing hormone protein was detected in wild-type and Erk3(-/-) lungs at E14.5, with significantly temporally altered expression through embryonic day 18.5. Antenatal dexamethasone attenuated corticotropin-releasing hormone at embryonic day 18.5 in both wild-type and Erk3(-/-) lungs (0.56-fold and 0.67-fold; P < .001). Wild type mice responded to glucocorticoid administration with increased pulmonary surfactant protein B (P = .003). In contrast, dexamethasone treatment in Erk3(-/-) mice resulted in decreased surfactant protein B (P = .012). In human validation studies, we confirmed that corticotropin-releasing hormone protein is present in the fetal lung at 18 weeks of gestation and increases in expression with progression towards viability (22 weeks of gestation; P < .01).

CONCLUSION:
Characterization of whole transcriptome gene expression revealed glucocorticoid-mediated regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone and surfactant protein B via Erk3-independent and -dependent mechanisms, respectively. We demonstrated for the first time the expression and temporal regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone protein in midtrimester human fetal lung. This unique model allows the effects of corticosteroids on fetal pulmonary morphologic condition to be distinguished from functional gene pathway regulation. These findings implicate Erk3 as a potentially important molecular mediator of antenatal glucocorticoid action in promoting surfactant protein production in the preterm neonatal lung and expanding our understanding of key mechanisms of clinical therapy to improve neonatal survival

Click Here For Article
Thu
3/30
Epidemiology Seminar Series
Epidemiology Seminar - Mark Pearce, PhD, MSc Epidemiology Seminar Series
Epidemiology Seminar - Mark Pearce, PhD, MSc
Thu 3/30 12:00PM - 1:00PM
Public Health Auditorium (G023)

Mark Pearce, PhD, MSc
Professor of Applied Epidemiology, Newcastle University, England, UK

Thousand Families Study

Dean Burke to address "One Health, One Planet' symposium at Phipps exploring environmental impact on human health

PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW - On...
Dean Burke to address "One Health, One Planet' symposium at Phipps exploring environmental impact on human health

PITTSBURGH TRIBUNE-REVIEW - One expert sharing this focus on environment, disease prevention and improving health, is  DONALD BURKE, dean at the Pitt Public Health and associate vice chancellor for global health. Burke says the region still has work to do for healthier communities, “The state of our... (03/28/2017)

Anson invited to share student services wisdom with colleages at ASPPH annual meeting

We're proud of JOAN ANSON, who...
Anson invited to share student services wisdom with colleages at ASPPH annual meeting

We're proud of JOAN ANSON, who led a forum on "Student Services: Lessons Learned from the Field - Navigating Professional Growth in Student Affairs" at the ASPPH Annual Meeting in DC. It's wonderful to see our staff and faculty recognized as valuable leaders within the Association of Schools and Pro... (03/17/2017)

Work by Cura Zika's Sadovsky leads to confirmation that the human placenta is most vulnerable to Zika in first trimester

MEDICALRESEARCH.COM - Work by ...
Work by Cura Zika's Sadovsky leads to confirmation that the human placenta is most vulnerable to Zika in first trimester

MEDICALRESEARCH.COM - Work by collaborator YOEL SADOVSKY, scientific board advisor for our CURA ZIKA initiative, finds that the mature placenta was likely to be resistant to infection. His work led to recent research confirmation that the greatest vulnerability to Zika is in the first trimester. (03/16/2017)

HUGEN's Feingold studies how genes influence facial appearance

INSIDEUPMC - Senior associate ...
HUGEN's Feingold studies how genes influence facial appearance

INSIDEUPMC - Senior associate dean, geneticist, and biostatistician ELEANOR FEINGOLD contributed to this interdisciplinary research team's findings: measures of eye, nose, and facial breadth could be associated with genetic variants in certain regions of the genome. In several of these regions, gene... (03/08/2017)

AJPH focuses on academic public health and the firearm crisis

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEA...
AJPH focuses on academic public health and the firearm crisis

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PUBLIC HEALTH -  In its March 2017 edition, AJPH takes a closer look at academic public health and the firearm crisis. Click to view featured articles and plan to attend the Food for Thought screening and discussion of Making a Killing: Guns, Greed, and the NRA   on Thursday, 2... (02/20/2017)
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