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Childhood bullying could mean health risks in adulthood, EPI's Matthews warns

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UPI - "The long term effects of bullying involvement are important to establish," EPI's KAREN MATTHEWS, the lead researcher from the University of Pittsburgh, said in a press release. "Most research on bullying is based on addressing mental health outcomes, but we wished to examine the potential impact of involvement in bullying on physical health and psychosocial risk factors for poor physical health." 

EPI's Brink comments on asthma among us

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POST-GAZETTE - A disturbing topic is the racial disparity in the cases of asthma. EPI's LUANN BRINK has reported rates for African-Americans that are nearly double the rates for whites. Pollution sources are clustered in areas where many African-Americans live, leading to this disparity. 

EPI's Strotmeyer selected as chair-elect of the Gerontological Society of America's Health Sciences Section

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ELSA S. STROTMEYER, associate professor of epidemiology at Pitt Public Health, was voted chair-elect of the Gerontological Society of America's Health Sciences Section. She will assume her role in November, joining colleagues from around the country in accepting responsibility for matters of governance and strategic planning with GSA. 

Important news about vaccines for children, with EPI's van Panhuis

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CONSUMER REPORTS - Myth #2: It’s Safer to Space Out Kids' Vaccines. That's unwise, says EPI's WILBERT VAN PANHUIS. The CDC bases the schedule on disease risks and vaccine effectiveness at specific ages, and the way vaccines may interact with each other. “To start mixing this up is really complicated and actually can be dangerous,” he says—in part because putting vaccines off can leave kids vulnerable to infectious diseases. 

Zimmerman and Nowalk suggest there may still be a place for the nasal flu vaccine

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CONTAGION LIVE - A research team including senior author RICHARD ZIMMERMAN, BCHS, and alumna MARY PATRICIA NOWALK (EPI '93), notes that despite its lower efficacy rates, eliminating the nasal influenza vaccine has resulted in a reduced overall rate of flu vaccine uptake in the United States. Thus, eliminating this form of vaccination may lead to more flu-related illnesses. The study finds that it would take only relatively small changes to tip th... 

Bodnar receives outstanding alumnus award from UNC Chapel Hill

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Vice-chair for research in the Department of Epidmiology, Lisa Bodnar is to receive the Outstanding Alumnus Award from the Department of Nutrition, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The award will be presented at a ceremony on Friday, April 28, 2017. 

EPI's Strotmeyer newly elected officer for the Gerontological Society of America

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The Gerontological Society of America (GSA), the nation’s largest interdisciplinary organization devoted to the field of aging, announced its newest elected officers, including Elsa S. Strotmeyer, Department of Epidemiology. Officers are chosen by the GSA membership of more than 5,500 researchers, educators, and practitioners, and are responsible for matters of governance and strategic planning, and represent the Society’s four membership section... 

Orchard receives medal as newly inaugurated Distinguished Professor of Epidemiology

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On April 13, 2017, TREVOR ORCHARD shared his inaugural lecture as Distinguished Professor of Epidemiology with Chancellor Patrick Gallegher and a throng of well-wishers during an event sponsored by Patricia Beeson, provost, senior vice chancellor, and chief academic officer of the University of Pittsburgh. Orchard's talk was titled "The Cardiovascular Complications of Type 1 Diabetes: A 30-year Pittsburgh Perspective." 

EPI's Thurston finds early hot flashes are frequently linked with heart risk

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CBS NEWS - Among women between 40 and 53 years of age, frequent hot flashes were linked to poorer function in blood vessels, the study found. This association was independent of other heart disease risk factors, noted the team led by REBECCA THURSTON, EPI faculty, professor of psychiatry and psychology, and director of the Women's Biobehavioral Health Laboratory. 

Early onset hot flashes may signal higher heart risks, says EPI's Thurston

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THE PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER - Hot flashes may be more than a troublesome nuisance for some women during menopause -- they may be a signal for increased risk of heart disease, suggests a team led by REBECCA THURSTON, Department of Epidemiology. The study showed that the association was independent of other heart disease risk factors, and the link seemed restricted to the younger women in the study -- there was no such relationship among women aged 5... 

Epi Gives Back brings Safe Sex Kit assembly to Pitt Public Health commons

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Epi Gives Back, an organization of students, faculty, and staff led by NANCY GLYNN, volunteered to assist the Allegheny County Health Department with assembling Safe Sex Kits for distribution through regional health clinics. ACHD supplied condoms, lubricant, and informational packets for the service project. 

Epi Gives Back collaborates with ACHD to assemble Safe Sex Kits

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Epi Gives Back is a Department of Epidemiology group with a goal of contributing to the Pittsburgh community through volunteer service projects. Students and faculty recently volunteered with the Allegheny County Health Department, packing safe sex kits (comprised of condoms, lubricants, and informational literature) are designed for distribution through local health agencies. For details about upcoming service projects to be held in the Pitt Pub... 

EPI's Yuan discovers telomere length predicts cancer risk

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R&D MAGAZINE - The caps of DNA at the end of our chromosomes known as telomeres are a crucial part of our biology. Their condition has been linked to aging, cancer, and a host of other conditions. The short and long extremes of telomere length significantly increase cancer risk, according to new research by EPI professor and study lead author JIAN-MIN YUAN. His team found that certain cancers are much more likely in people with longer telomeres, ... 

Large Epidemiological Study by EPI's Yuan finds Telomere Length Predicts Cancer Risk

 UPMC.COM/MEDIA -- Longer-than-expected telomeres “caps” of DNA that protect the tips of chromosomes may predict increased cancer risk and be a potential target for future therapeutics according to UPCI researcher and professor of epidemiology JIAN-MIN YUAN and colleagues--including doctoral candidate ZHENSHENG WANG (EPI ’17)--who analyzed blood samples and health data on more than 28,000 Chinese people enrolled in the Singapore Chinese Health ... 

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