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Alumni Inducted into Delta Omega Honor Society at 2016 ceremony

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Four alumni were inducted into Pitt Public Health's Omicron Chapter of the Delta Omega Honor Society during the 2016 Alumni Awards dinner. - Andrew Althouse (EPI '13) - Gwendolyn Haile Cattledge (EPI '89) - Mary H. Huynh (EPI '03) - Christina Louise Wilds (BCHS '97, '06)  

The Opioid Epidemic: Pitt Public Health Examines the Data

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Western Pennsylvania is in the midst of a drug overdose epidemic, prompting the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health to create a pilot grant project that funds several studies exploring different aspects of the problem. Jeanine Buchanich, Ph.D., deputy director of the Center for Biostatistics and Epidemiology at Pitt Public Health, discusses her pilot project to examine data on overdose deaths. The results will be made availa... 

Anne B. Newman,chair of epidemiology, Elected to Prestigious Medical Association

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Anne B. Newman, M.D., M.P.H. , professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology at the   University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health , was elected to the   Association of American Physicians   at the nonprofit organization’s annual meeting recently held in Chicago. Dr. Newman was inducted into the association for having “attained excellence” in the “pursuit of medical knowledge, and the advancement through experimentation ... 

Most Patients Likely to See Reductions in Pain and Disability after Bariatric Surgery; Study Identifies Who Benefits Most

In the three years following bariatric surgery, the majority of patients experienced an improvement in pain and walking ability, as well as a lessening of the degree to which back or leg pain interfered with work, according a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health-led analysis of a multi-site clinical study published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association. 

Pitt Finding Suggests New Heart Disease Screening Target for Middle-Aged Black Women

Middle-aged black women have higher levels of a protein in their blood associated with a predictor of heart disease than their white counterparts, even after other factors, such as obesity, are taken into consideration, according to a study conducted by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health and School of Medicine. 

Veronica Sansing-Foster (EPI '08, '10)

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Expectations were always high for Veronica Sansing-Foster, but her ascent to administrator and reseacher at the Food and Drug Administration wasn't the result of a calculated career path. Reflecting on the road that took her from the South Side of Chicago to the key post, she cites her own ability and hard work, her ties to generous mentors at Pitt Pubilc Health, and a measure of serendipity. 

Lewis Kuller: To Reduce Risk of Dementia, Reduce Risk of Heart Disease

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Vascular diseases after age 80 is associated with a greater risk of dementia, as is simply living longer, according to new research out of the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. In a small group of participants, the researchers found an association between zero or low levels of artery-clogging calcium deposits and a low risk of dementia and cardiovascular events, suggesting that the cardiovascular risk factors that lead t... 

Testosterone Treatment Shown for First Time to Benefit Men Over 65

The University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health was among a dozen sites nationwide to participate in the first clinical trial to show that testosterone treatment for men aged 65 and older improves sexual function, walking ability and mood.                                                                                                                                                                 Results of The Testosterone Trials... 

Epidemiologist Samar El Khoudary Recognized for Outstanding Research in Cardiovascular Endocrinology

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Samar El Khoudary Ph.D., M.P.H., assistant professor of epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, was recently recognized by the Endocrine Society for research published last year in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism on cardiovascular fat and menopause.In “The Best of JCEM 2015,” Dr. El Khoudary’s paper, titled “Cardiovascular Fat, Menopause, and Sex Hormones in Women: The SWAN Cardiovascular ... 

Sedentary Behavior Linked to Poor Health in Adults with Severe Obesity, Independent of Exercise

Sedentary behavior is associated with poor cardiovascular health and diabetes in adults with severe obesity, independent of how much exercise they perform, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health-led study showed for the first time.  The finding, published online and scheduled for the March issue of the journal Preventive Medicine, could be used to design and test programs for adults with severe obesity that emphasize reducin... 

Sedentary Behavior Linked to Poor Health in Adults with Severe Obesity, Independent of Exercise

Sedentary behavior is associated with poor cardiovascular health and diabetes in adults with severe obesity, independent of how much exercise they perform, a University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health-led study showed for the first time. 

Pitt Public Health-led study finds HIV-positive men at higher risk of developing heart disease indicator

Men with HIV were at significantly higher risk for development of coronary artery calcium (CAC), an early sign of coronary heart disease, according to a large national study led by the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. In addition, the study identified two modifiable risk factors independently associated with increased incidence of CAC: smoking and increased insulin resistance. The results are published in the journal  A... 

Lawrence A. Kingsley: HIV-positive men at higher risk of developing heart disease indicator

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Men with HIV were at significantly higher risk for development of coronary artery calcium (CAC), an early sign of coronary heart disease, according to a large national study led by the  University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health . In addition, the study identified two modifiable risk factors independently associated with increased incidence of CAC: smoking and increased insulin resistance. “Taken together, these findings undersc... 

To Reduce Risk of Infant Death, Shed Excess Pounds Before Becoming Pregnant

Achieving a healthy weight before becoming pregnant and gaining an appropriate amount of weight during pregnancy significantly reduce the risk of the baby dying in his or her first year of life, according to new research from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. 

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