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Analyzing street drugs an early warning system in opioid crisis

ASPPH FRIDAY LETTER - Findings published in the journal Public Health Reports suggest that real-time information about stamp bags can be used to supplement current public health surveillance measures and could serve as an early warning of new illegal drugs of high lethality available at the local level. It is the first robust and detailed public health report of a stamp bag surveillance system.  

Thurston study reveals sexual harassment can make victims physically sick

THE WASHINGTON POST - “People need to understand that trauma is not just something that happens in the mind,” said EPI's REBECCA THURSTON, who has spent the past four years studying women who have suffered sexual abuse and harassment. Over time, she discovered, sexual harassment can work like a poison, stiffening women’s blood vessels, worsening blood flow, and harming the inner lining of their hearts.   

Lee and Moon featured in Pitt Magazine as Change Agents

PITT MAGAZINE - Two of Pitt’s featured “change agents” are Pitt Public Health grads. SEUNG WOOK LEE (BIOS '79, '82) and HYUN KYUNG MOON (EPI '86) were pioneers and trailblazers in their fields whose careers were made possible by degrees from Pitt. “Everything I’ve done is possible because of Pitt,” says Moon. “It gave me the credentials to be in the room."  

Kuller endorses statement warning breast cancer patients may be at increased risk for heart disease

CNN - The American Heart Association released a scientific statement, published in Circulation, warning that breast cancer patients may be at an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases and could benefit from discussing those risks with their doctors. The statement is "long overdue," said EPI's LEWIS KULLER who also has studied cardiovascular disease and breast cancer.   

Albert and Agimi find in-person license renewal helps reduce dementia-related motor vehicle crashes

TRIB LIVE - Analyzing motor-vehicle-related hospital admissions, in-person license renewal laws and vision testing were found to dramatically reduce the number of motor vehicle accidents by drivers with dementia, according to BCHS' STEVEN ALBERT and YLL AGIMI (EPI '12) as published in Neurology.   

Creppage says real-time information about stamp bags could serve as early warning of new illegal drugs

MEDICAL LIFE SCIENCES NEWS - In two years, fentanyl went from nonexistent to found in more than 1 in 7 stamp bags. This new information "could be used to inform educational campaigns, allocate limited resources and devise prevention strategies," says KATHLEEN CREPPAGE (EPI '18) while EPI's ANTHONY FABIO added that the work "is an important step in developing multi-disciplinary tools to quickly identify current and future sources of new drugs tha... 

Newman gives her take on aging

KAISER HEALTH NEWS - At a time when women increasingly live into their 90s and more men reach their 80s, the art of aging requires work, thought, planning, and, yes, spontaneity. “I don’t think we give enough respect to what it takes to age well — until it happens to you,” said EPI's ANNE NEWMAN. “It’s a balance between fighting it and accepting it that requires a great deal of grace and courage.”  

Kelsey receives alumnae Achievement Award from Mount Holyoke College

EPI's SHERYL KELSEY was recognized for being a role model for women pursuing public health careers in statistics and epidemiology. Kelsey dedicated her career to the research and design of clinical trials and registries in the field of cardiology, diabetes, women’s health, neurology, and ophthalmology, demonstrating the highest standards of scientific inquiry in a truly collaborative spirit.  

EPI's Adibi to address 2018 One Health One Community Symposium at Phipps

EPI's JENNIFER ADIBI has been announced as a featured speaker for the 2018 One Health One Community Symposium at Phipps Conservatory.  Taking Place on March 7 & 8, this year's event will center on the theme "Health Impacts: Chemicals of Concern in the Environment," with a special focus on endocrine disruptors. Take advantage of early-bird registration through Fri., Jan. 26, including both opening reception and symposium.  

Swasey finds long-term adherence to LDL targets lacking in type 1 diabetes

HELIO - Research from epidemiologist KRYSTAL K. SWASEY and colleagues has found that high rates of cardiovascular disease for those managing type1 diabetes with childhood onset may indicate that current recommendations for blood pressure and triglyceride levels may be too lax. 

Newman contributes to discussion on whether Trump’s physical should include a cognitive screen

MEDPAGE TODAY - Epidemiology chair ANNE NEWMAN says, "“It is reasonable to test anyone with concerns about change in cognitive ability, especially after age 80. There are numerous screening tests that tap the main cognitive abilities such as the mini-mental status exam, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and informant questionnaires. These tests focus on short-term memory and language.” 

Manzi receives Richard E. Deitrick Humanity in Medicine Award

Alumna SUSAN M. MANZI was honored with the 2016 Richard E. Deitrick Humanity in Medicine Award during the  Celebration of Excellence Awards Gala , Saturday, March 4, 2017, at Heinz Field. Established in 2012, the award honors a physician who has improved the lives of patients by caring for them with integrity, honesty, and respect of their human dignity, and serves as a role model for other physicians. Manzi is chair of the Department of Medici... 

Cauley on FRAX screening's reduction of hip fractures for health older women

MEDSCAPE - Commenting on the study in an accompanying commentary, EPI’s JANE CAULEY points out that high-risk women in the current study had a 17.9 percent probability of sustaining a hip fracture and a 30 percent probability of sustaining a major osteoporotic fracture at 10 years. “Thus, despite the absence of a positive impact on the primary outcome, the results of the SCOOP study nevertheless have important public health implications.” 

Burke weighs in on future of opioid epidemic

PHILADELPHIA ENQUIRER - Modeling by epidemiologist DONALD BURKE suggests that 150,000 to 200,000 people on pain pills transition to injection drugs every year. “The more people using heroin, the greater the probability that more people will use heroin, just like the spread of an infectious disease.” He wonders whether the kind of response used for epidemics might work: Determine key transition points, like when a painkiller addict is likely to tr... 

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