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Catov finds preterm birth linked to heart disease later in life

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WESA-FM - A new study found that women who had preterm births and a pattern of increasing blood pressure were also more likely to have greater calcium buildup in their hearts, putting them at higher risk for cardiovascular disease and heart attacks. Associate professor, alumna, and lead author JANET CATOV (EPI ’05) said it’s interesting that women who also had increasing blood pressure but gave birth to full-term babies didn’t have as much plaque... 

Gieraltowski says it's ok to eat romaine lettuce again

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NPR - After weeks of warnings to toss out romaine grown in the Yuma, Ariz., region, the CDC says there are no longer any greens coming from this region. Now that lettuce grown in the Yuma region is likely no longer being sold in supermarkets or served in restaurants, LAURA GIERALTOWSKI (EPI '09) head of the CDC's foodborne outbreak response team says, "We hope people can enjoy their romaine lettuce again."  

The new 2018 Pittsburgh Summer Institute cohort

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The 2018 Pittsburgh Summer Institute (PSI), a collaborative internship program between the Allegheny County Health Department and Pitt Public Health, welcomed 16 students at orientation yesterday. The students will be addressing real-world public health problems and completing a group project about the tobacco retail environment.  

Colon cancer risk depends on polyp type found during colonoscopy

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HEALIO - The risk for colorectal cancer is about 2.5 times higher in patients who have advanced adenomatous polyps detected during colonoscopy vs. those with no adenomas, but the risk does not appear to be increased among patients with non-advanced adenomas. These findings suggest that repeat colonoscopy may not be required as frequently for patients with non-advanced adenomas, according to EPI professor, ROBERT SCHOEN.    

Bertolet receives Diversity in Curriculum Award

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The Diversity in the Curriculum Awards celebrate and reward Pitt faculty who have participated in the Provost’s Diversity Institute for Faculty Development and who are making diversity and inclusiveness a part of their teaching practice. EPI's MARNIE BERTOLET, along with four other Pitt faculty, were awarded for their efforts in integrating diversity and inclusion concepts into their course and curriculum.  

Dean's Day 2018 EPI departmental award recipients

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This year, KATHLEEN MAKSIMOWICZ-MCKINNON (MPH '18) received the prize for the master's category and CHRISTIAN GARCIA (PhD '18) received the doctoral prize.   

Bertolet among presenters during Provost's Diversity Institute for Faculty Development

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EPI's MARNIE BERTOLET is among the facilitator's for the workshop Transforming Curriculum to Be More Inclusive, happening on May 10. All facilitators of this session are Provost's Diversity Award winners.  Part of a rich series of workshops happening May 3-16 on associated topics like structural racism and bringing global perspectives to our fields and our courses.   

Jane Cauley receives distinguished professor award (photo gallery)

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Jane Cauley was appointed as a Distinguished Professor, the highest honor that can be accorded to a member of the professorate at Pitt. Such a designation recognizes eminence in several fields of study, transcending accomplishments in and contributions to a single discipline, in addition to national recognition.  At the ceremony, Cauley gave a presentation entitled Pivotal Directions and People in my 30-Year Osteoporosis Journey. Congratulati... 

2018 Celebration of Student Awards

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On April 28, 2018, Pitt Public Health celebrated recent graduates with awards given upon the culmination of a degree program. Delta Omega's honor society inductees were announced and outstanding thesis/essay and dissertation awards were conferred. Outstanding Student Awards were also given at both the master's and doctoral level, as well as Dean's Service Awards.  

Caffeine in pregnancy tied to childhood weight gain

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REUTERS - "Caffeine in utero may change how the brain develops," said EPI's LISA BODNAR. "This is important because the brain has a strong influence over appetite." Caffeine passes rapidly through the placenta and has been linked to an increased risk of miscarriage and restricted fetal development, previous research has found.   

Three MPH students selected for the Milken Institute's Health Leaders Program

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The Milken Institute is a nonprofit, nonpartisan think tank determined to increase global prosperity by advancing collaborative solutions that widen access to capital, create jobs, and improve health. In 2018, they launched the Future Health Leaders Pilot Program to create the right connections between organizations, students, and schools. Students chosen this year from Pitt Public Health are KAITLYN SAAL-RIDPATH (JD/MPH ’20), JESSICA SALERNO (I... 

Celedon tells working parents, take a deep breath: preschool, daycare do not raise asthma risk

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UCSF NEWS - A study that involved combing through more than 50 years of data to assess the link between asthma and daycare and preschool attendance may provide welcome reassurance to working parents. Early child care does not boost children’s risk for developing this common respiratory disease, according to the study led by researchers including JUAN CELEDON, EPI and HUGEN professor.   

Catov among scientists researching heart disease link to pre-eclampsia

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PITTSBURGH POST GAZETTE - While her baby is still a toddler, a woman who had pre-eclampsia during her pregnancy might already be on the path to heart disease and not getting the care she needs. EPI's Janet Catov is among those researchers examining what pregnancy-related signals identify women at the highest risk of future cardiovascular disease. Helping a woman at that early point, with interventions that can reverse or treat risk factors, shou... 

Traveling to Brazil? Get a yellow fever vaccination first says Marques

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WASHINGTON POST - Travelers headed to Brazil should make an appointment for a yellow fever vaccination. “If you are going for tourism, you should definitely get the vaccine,” said EPI’s ERNESTO MARQUES. The CDC recently raised the level of concern in response to a yellow fever outbreak. The agency expanded its warning to travelers unvaccinated tourists contracted the mosquito-borne virus in newly identified hot spots. 

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